September 5, 2013

I'm gonna shine out in the wild kindness
and hold the world to its word



Bill Fisher, Untitled 7, 2007

* Love this: Please Stop Complaining About How Busy You Are. excerpt:

My favorite "busy" humble-brag was that of a potential client who apologized for lack of communication due to a "week-long fire drill." What does that even mean? Does this mean there were fake fires, but not real ones, all week? Does calling it a "drill" mean that everything is okay? Is your business in flames? Should I call someone?

Then there was the date I had with a fellow who was so busy "crashing on deadlines" that he asked me to "just make a reservation somewhere" for him. I was floored.

So much of this is about out-doing each other. To say that "I'm busier than you are" means I'm more important, or that my time is more valuable, or that I am "winning" at some never-finished rat race to Inbox Zero. (Inbox Zero is another absurd contest to tackle at another time.) What you're trying to say with these responses is: I'm busier, more in-demand, more successful.

Here's the thing: it's harming how we communicate, connect, and interact. Everyone is busy, in different sorts of ways. Maybe you have lots of clients, or are starting a new business, or are taking care of a newborn. The point is this: with limited time and unlimited demands on that time, it's easy to fill your plate with activities constantly. But this doesn't mean that you should.

To assume that being "busy" (at this point it has totally lost its meaning) is cool, or brag-worthy, or tweetable, is ridiculous. By lobbing these brags, endlessly puffing our shoulders about how "up to my neck" we are, we're missing out on important connections with family and friends, as well as personal time. In addition to having entire conversations about how busy we are, we fail to share feelings with friends and family, ask about important matters, and realize that the "busy" is something that can be put on hold for a little while.

* "Never treat your audience as customers; always as partners." -- James Stuart

3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I, too, am over being "busy."

Post-busy.

Sherwood Anderson

4:01 PM  
Anonymous klipschutz said...

"Humble-brag" gets my vote for the hyphenated word (phrase?) of the 21st century. How can any other hyphenated word (phrase?) compete?

10:36 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"More and more people in this country no longer make or do anything tangible; if your job wasn’t performed by a cat or a boa constrictor in a Richard Scarry book I’m not sure I believe it’s necessary. I can’t help but wonder whether all this histrionic exhaustion isn’t a way of covering up the fact that most of what we do doesn’t matter."
--Tim Kreider

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/30/the-busy-trap/?_r=0

12:26 PM  

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